Bulldog

Print Print

English Bulldog

English Bulldog

General Description


(Bulldog) Although Bulldogs have comparatively small statures, they are stout, exceptionally sturdy, and widely built. They have muscular legs that are set squarely and contribute to the breed’s “waddle”. Their heads are thick and very large-sized with cheeks that reach the sides of their eyes. The Bulldog’s muzzle is short and pug and features a broad black nose with wide nostrils. Their upper lips are pendent and close over an undershot lower jaw. Bulldogs have round dark eyes that are set far apart and a pair of small, thin ears that are folded back. Their short tails are carried low. The coat of this breed exists in a number of colors including red, washed-out red, white, brindle, pale yellow, or fawn. Many coats of this breed are a mixture of several of the above colors.

Know something we don’t? Add it here

Character


Despite Bulldogs’ “grumpy” facial expression, they are one of the kindest and gentlest of all dog breeds. They seek human affection and are constantly striving for attention. Owners of this breed should make sure to devote time and energy to this breed so they don’t become lonely. Bulldogs make excellent family pets and they usually get along well with other pets, but they can become leery or feisty towards strange dogs. As puppies, Bulldogs are very vibrant and full of energy, but they mellow out and slow down as they become older. Bulldogs are known for their guarding abilities, but they do not attack people. This breed drools and snores very loudly.

Size


12 – 16 inches

18 inches

Weight


49 – 55 pounds

Females tend to be considerably smaller and more petite than boys. Females, when fully developed, tend to weigh 5-10 pounds less than comparably aged boys. The heads of boys are generally larger than Femles. And the boys’ bodies and build are typically referrd to as the breed standard. Shortly after birth, it is common for the boys’ heads to be large. The bodies grow into the head size. Females are the reverse. Bodies are typically larger than the heads at birth. Over time, a female’s head will "grow into" the body porportonately.

General Health


Because of the Bulldog’s pug nose, he is susceptible to breathing problems. Some Bulldogs also have small windpipes. Poor eyesight is also a health concern for this breed. Bulldog puppies are often delivered by caesarian section because of their massive heads. Bulldogs are prone to flatulence that may offend some people. They also are more likely than most other dog breeds to develop skin infections or suffer from heat stroke. Bulldogs have a life span that varies, but the average is 13 years. This breed averages 4 to 5 puppies per litter.

Can live for over 14 years.

The average life expectancy of a well bred Bulldog from a top breeder is actually considerably less than 13 years.

Life expectancy is unfortunately closer to 8-10 years

History


Bulldogs are descendants of the ancient Asiatic mastiff, but the breed’s development actually took place in Great Britain. The name “Bulldog” is medieval in origin and refers to the brawny build of the breed and the aggression and power with which the Bulldog originally attacked bulls in arenas. This combative practice was outlawed in the nineteenth century.

Maintenance


Bulldogs have a short-haired coat that is easy to groom and take care of. Combing and brushing with a firm bristle brush will assist with the shedding process. Bulldogs should be bathed only as necessary, and their faces should be wiped with a clean, damp cloth on a daily basis to clean inside their wrinkles. Bulldogs are average shedders.

It is very important to ensure that the nasal passages and ears are kept clean as well. Weekly grooming of these areas is important. Cleaning under a Bulldog’s rope/fold should occur multiple times each week, and daily in many cases. It is a good idea to use a mild topical anti-microbial solution to clean these areas. Check with your vet for an appropriate solution. Also; due to Bulldogs being prone to skin irritations, check with your vet to determine bathing frequency. It is not uncommon to bathe a Bulldog monthly; bathing should be done with a very mild solution/shampoo such as HyLite – that contains little or no soap products. Additionally, it is important to keep the eyes clean. Thus, daily (or more frequent) cleaning is a good idea, especially since Bulldogs are prone to eye irritations such as Cherry Eye and/or entropion. Thorough cleansing of the chin and area around your Bulldog’s lips/mouth after a meal is essential. This will prevent skin irritations (often reflected as red coloration) and spotting.

Ideal Environment


Some English Bulldogs enjoy exercising, but others would prefer to lie around the house all day long. Owners of this breed should encourage at least a bit of regular exercise to promote good health. Bulldogs are a good choice of pet for families with apartments or small households. This breed doesn’t need a yard. Bulldogs are sensitive to extreme climates.

It is also good to understand that. often times, the temperaments of Bulldog boys and females is quite different. It is common to find that females tend to be more placid and aloof, while the boys are more gregarious, loyal and playful. These differences are more pronounced over time, but before they slow down from advanced aging.

American Bulldog

American Bulldog

General Description


American Bulldogs are a stout, burly breed, but they are also extremely agile and swift. They have a wide chest and a tapered, muscular neck that may or may not have a slight dewlap. The breed features a strong-boned, compact body with straight limbs and burly hindquarters. They have broad, square heads with a pronounced furrow, muscular cheeks, and a box-shaped muzzle. Their stop is prominent, defined, and deep. Their well-developed teeth meet in a tight undershot or a scissors bite. American Bulldogs have a variety of acceptable ear types including pendant, half-pricked, and rose. Their eye color varies. The American Bulldog has black, loose-fitting lips and a black nose. Their tails are low-set and taper to a point. A variety of colors exist for the American Bulldog’s short, harsh, close-fitting coat. Many variations of white, brindle, brown, red, and tan are acceptable for show.

They get black spots on their bellys

They can also have red noses not just black.

Know something we don’t? Add it here

Character


American Bulldogs are dutiful, courageous, and protective, but they should not be aggressive. Despite their reputation, American Bulldogs make wonderful family pets. While they are capable of being competitive with other dogs, they should not initiate a challenge unreasonably. The breed is not hostile, though they have a genetic disposition towards heroic acts, bravery, and fighting. When properly raised and sufficiently trained, American Bulldogs make excellent companions. They are naturally good with children and they cater to the wants and needs of their owner(s). The American Bulldog has an alert, intelligent, and confident disposition, and they have strong protective instincts. Sometimes leery with strangers or aggressive towards other dogs, it’s important for an American Bulldog to be obedience trained and well-socialized at a young age.

Size


20 – 28 inches

Weight


60 – 120 pounds

120-145 pounds

60 to 120 pounds (females) 120 to 145 (males)

General Health


American Bulldogs are prone to hip dysplasia. They are a comparatively long-lived breed, and can often live for up to 16 years. They average 11 puppies per litter.

When purchasing an American Bulldog, make sure the breeder have their dogs PennHip, CERF (eyes) and BAER screened for deafness. This breed is prone to deafness, and like most dog breeds, eye problems as well.

History


Many of the earliest bulldogs came to England and America with their masters. The English Bulldog was bred down to a smaller size and given a softer a personality, but the American variety was still fierce and large by comparison. Just before and during WWII, the American version was becoming extinct. This development disappointed a man by the name of John D. Johnson, so he gathered the best species he could find. He then proceeded to breed them. Many claim that John D. Johnson is solely responsible for preventing the American Bulldog from becoming extinct. American Bulldogs have many natural talents including tracking, guarding, and weight-pulling. They also make excellent farm, working, hunting, and watchdogs.

Maintenance


The American Bulldog’s short, harsh coat is easy to groom and take care of. Brushing with a firm bristle brush will help the shedding process. This breed should be bathed only as necessary. They are average shedders.

Ideal Environment


American Bulldogs need a fair amount of exercise. They do best in households with at least an average-sized yard, but they can tolerate an apartment or house without one if they are sufficiently exercised. Because of their inactivity indoors, long walks and other forms of exercise are needed to ensure their mental and physical happiness.

French Bulldog

French Bulldog

General Description


The French Bulldog is a compact, small- to medium-sized dog with heavy bone structure and an overall appearance that denotes intelligence, strength, and alert curiosity. All parts of the French Bulldog are well in proportion to one another, and no single feature is excessively prominent or imbalanced in comparison to the rest of the body. The breed’s neck is thick and well-arched, and loose skin is present on the throat. Their back is strong, short, and broadest at the shoulders. They have a broad, deep chest with well-developed ribs and a moderate tuck-up. Tails of this breed are short, low-hung, and thick at the base, and they may be straight or screwed. Their forelegs are stout, well-muscled, and wide-set, and their medium-sized feet are compact and firmly set. Their strong, muscular hind legs are longer than their forelegs, so that their loins are elevated above their shoulders. Their hocks are well let-down. The head of the French Bulldog is large and square-shaped, and the top of the skull is flat between the ears. They have a slightly rounded forehead and a broad, deep muzzle with well-developed cheeks. The breed’s stop is pronounced and well-defined, and there is a hollow groove between the dog’s eyes. Heavy facial wrinkles form a soft roll over the breed’s short black nose. Their medium-sized eyes are wide-set and set low into their skull. Their elongated ears are broad at the broad at the base, high-set, and carried erect. The short-haired coat of the French Bulldog is fine, brilliant, and smooth. Coat colors for this breed include brindle, fawn, white, brindle and white, and a number of other shades. The skin of the French Bulldog is soft and loose, and it forms wrinkles around their face and shoulders.

Know something we don’t? Add it here

Character


The French Bulldog is a cheerful, low-maintenance companion. They are pleasant, affectionate, and sweet, and they have a propensity to be very clownish. They are alert, curious, and even-tempered. This breed usually forms a strong bond with one person. While they are generally accepting of strangers and other animals, some males of this breed may be aggressive towards other dogs. The French Bulldog needs human companionship and attention. If left ignored or unattended for long periods of time, they can become mischievous and depressed. Although somewhat willful at times, they can be trained relatively easily by a patient owner. They are not a loud or hyper breed, but they are very enthusiastic and persistent. They get along best with older, more considerate children. A fair number of French Bulldogs have a tendency to drool and slobber.

Size


12 inches

Weight


19 – 28 pounds

General Health


The French Bulldog is susceptible to eye and respiratory problems. If these dogs become overweight, they are likely to experience symptoms like wheezing, snoring, and troubled breathing. Because of their large heads, many female French Bulldogs deliver by Cesarean section. This breed typically lives for 10 to 12 years.

History


The French Bulldog was initially developed in England by breeders who wanted to create a miniature version of the English Bulldog. In the 1860’s, some of these dogs were imported to France from Great Britain. French dog breeders crossed these miniature bulldogs with French Terriers and gave them the name “French Bulldog”. When the breed was returned to England for exhibition, the English became irate with the new name. Because the French Bulldog was originally an English breed, and because the Bulldog was a symbol of English culture, the English felt as though the name did not do their country’s efforts any justice.

Maintenance


The short-haired coat of the French Bulldog requires very little grooming or upkeep. Regular brushing will help keep the coat in good condition. This breed is an average shedder.

Ideal Environment


The French Bulldog overheats easily and is especially sensitive to harsh weather conditions. They prefer cooler climates and should not be exercised in warm weather. They are well-suited for life in a small household or apartment, and they do not require a yard. They are a comparatively active breed indoors.

Australian Bulldog

Australian Bulldog

General Description


(Aussie Bulldog) Australian Bulldogs have stout, compact bodies that are very strong and well-muscled. Generally, the bodies of female Australian Bulldogs should be longer than those of their male counterparts. Australian Bulldogs have a level top line and a broad chest with the brisket well let down. Their tail cartridge is straight off the back, and their tail may or may not be docked. Australian Bulldogs have a very strong, square head that is substantially deep and wide at the muzzle. They have a pronounced stop between their large, wide-set eyes. This breed has nose wrinkle. Australian Bulldogs bred for show have a near level bite and large teeth. Their wide jaw structure should be square at the top and bottom. Australian Bulldogs have a short, smooth coat that exists in a variety of colors. There are at least five shades of brindle that are suitable for show. Australian Bulldogs may also have a pied coat, meaning there is one coat color on the body that is more prominent than another. Australian Bulldogs often have a series of patches on their body.

Know something we don’t? Add it here

Character


Australian Bulldogs are a loving and loyal breed that enjoys spending time with their family. They love to play and they get along well with children. Because of their high intelligence, Australian Bulldogs respond well to obedience training. They are also a very easy breed to train from home. The Australian Bulldog is genuinely good-natured and loyal with a stable, kind temperament. They are alert and will make good watchdogs, but they are not guard dogs. Australian Bulldogs aren’t aggressive towards people, animals, or other dogs. They seek affection and comfort from their owners, and they have a personable demeanor. Without proper training, Australian Bulldogs can become a bit rambunctious.

Size


17 – 20 inches

Weight


50 – 78 pounds

General Health


Australian Bulldogs are a generally healthy breed. Breeders have done their best to eliminate the health issues that commonly afflict bulldogs.

History


The name “Australian Bulldog” was coined in 1998 by Noel and Tina Green- the founders of two bulldog breeding programs called N and T Green and Pip Nobes. The pair decided to cooperate together and breed a well-rounded bulldog. Their predominant focus was to construct a dog with a typical bulldog appearance, but one that also had a terrific personality. Despite the fact that this breed is not yet recognized by the ANKC as a pedigreed breed, the Australian Bulldog is recognized as a breed by the general public. All Australian Bulldogs should come with a breed certificate for their documentation that is issued by the UABA (United Aussie Bulldog Association).

Maintenance


Australian Bulldogs have a short, smooth, fine coat that is easy to groom and maintain. Brushing with a firm bristle brush and bathing as necessary are sufficient methods of upkeep. This breed is an average shedder. Australian Bulldogs should also have their faces wiped with a damp cloth on a daily basis to keep their facial wrinkles clean.

Ideal Environment


Australian Bulldogs aren’t recommended for a small household or apartment. This breed is an indoor dog, so they shouldn’t be left unattended outside or in a kennel. Australian Bulldogs are happiest in temperate climates. They need plenty of exercise.

Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog

Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog

General Description


(Otto) Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs are a well-developed breed of bulldog with a muscular build and unexaggerated features. The breed’s head is broad with a pronounced muzzle. They have loose, black lips and prominent, wide-set eyes that vary in color. Their ears are v-shaped and hang slightly sideways. Their long, tapered tails are left natural. Like other bulldog breeds, Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs have a very strong and sturdy body. Their hips are well-muscled and narrower than the chest. They have a level back and stout, powerful limbs. Their short, fairly stiff coat can be blue, red, or brown merle, and may have white or chocolate trimmings.

don’t be surprised if someone thinks your dog is a pit bull. Whatch out for breed bans. as the ABBB is often mistaken for pits.

Know something we don’t? Add it here

Character


Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs are dutiful, loyal dogs that make excellent companions. They will go to extreme lengths to defend their families, and they are very protective and patient with children. The breed is athletic, active, and has a lot of vigor and determination. They make excellent guard dogs and watchdogs. Comparatively intelligent, the Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog is easily and quickly trainable. This breed can be aggressive or attack when they feel threatened.

Size


24 inches

Weight


78-100 pounds

General Health


Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs have a comparatively small gene pool, so health issues like eyelid inversion are more prominent. Typically, this breed lives for 12 to 15 years.

History


Nearly extinct, there are only about 150 Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs in the world. They were developed in the 1800’s through Buck Lane’s breeding program in Georgia. A breed created solely by one family, every Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog is a direct descendant of Buck Lane’s dog, Otto.

Maintenance


Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs require little grooming. A quick combing or brushing can assist the shedding process and help remove dead hair. Bathing once every two weeks is sufficient. They are average shedders. Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs need rigorous exercise. Long walks and large backyards are ideal for this breed.

Ideal Environment


Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs will live happily in any environment, as long as they are exercised frequently. They are inactive indoors, so it’s necessary for them to spend significant time outside. Big backyards are best for this breed.

Catahoula Bulldog

Catahoula Bulldog, 1 and a half, black n white, smart like a whip!!<br /> heavily motivated by food of any variety!!<br /> well mannered

General Description


(Louisiana Catahoula Leopard, American Bulldog Hybrid) The Catahoula Bulldog is not a purebred dog, but rather a cross between the Louisiana Catahoula Leopard and the American Bulldog. It is a tight-skinned breed with a smooth, short-haired coat. In the majority of this breed’s cases, there is no undercoat. Colder climates can cause the Catahoula Bulldog to develop an under coat. The ears of this breed are of rose type or button over, and they are often cropped to give the dog a sophisticated appearance. The eyes of this breed vary in color, and they can come in a variety of hues including brown, ice blue, emerald green, gold, or a combination of any or all of the above. The breed’s coat also exists in a number of colors from merle to pure white.

The Catahoula Bulldog is recognized as 50% Catahoula Leopard and 50% American Bulldog in the first generation cross. In succeeding generations it may be 75%-25% mix in either direction.The 75%-25% cross should not be exceeded to maintain the desirable characteristics of each breed.

Know something we don’t? Add it here

Character


The Catahoula Bulldog is commonly utilized as a hunting, working, and protection dog. They make excellent companions. They have become a favorite family pet because of their beautiful coloring. They are loyal, devoted, and have strong protective instincts. While generally laid-back and mellow, this breed is alert to its surroundings and will react if it senses a threat. They love to please their owner(s) and are very patient with children. The Catahoula Bulldog needs firm, patient training from a person who can teach the dog what is expected of him. This breed is highly intelligent and learns quickly. They love to spend time with their family.

Size


24 – 26 inches

Weight


75 – 100 pounds

General Health


History


The Catahoula Bulldog is a very old American breed that is the result of a cross between the Louisiana Catahoula Leopard and the American Bulldog. While the Catahoula Bulldog has been bred for over a century, they are not a pure breed. Many dogs in this breed are not 50% purebred to 50% purebred. It is not uncommon for breeders to mix multi-generation crosses. For this reason, there have been no legitimate records kept in regards to the Catahoula Bulldog.

Maintenance


Victorian Bulldog

Victorian Bulldog

General Description


Victorian Bulldogs are similar in appearance to English Bulldogs. The only difference is in size because Victorian Bulldogs are much larger. Their head is round and sports the distinctive short flat bulldog muzzle. The breed’s small ears fold over into a “V” shape on the side of their head. Their small, dark eyes sit back in the head and are far apart. Like many bulldog breeds, their lower jaw protrudes farther than their upper jaw.  Under their short muzzles, their lips hang loose past their lower jaw. Their head leads directly into their wide, muscular necks which are covered with excess skin – another hallmark of many similar breeds.  Because of their extra height, their legs are much longer than an English Bulldog’s, even though their head is smaller. At the end of those lengthy legs are large, round paws.  Victorian Bulldogs have short, smooth coats which come in many colors, such as pure white, brindle, solid red, fallow, fawn, or white with spots of other colors.

Know something we don’t? Add it here

Character


Victorian Bulldogs are wonderful family dogs. They are good with children and dogs who share their homes, but they are sometimes unfriendly with new dogs. The breed adores getting attention from people. Although Victorian Bulldogs are extremely gentle, they will protect their family. The Victorian Bulldog is a sweet and playful breed that is also great for older people and young families. They also get along with other non-canine animals, too.

Size


16-19 inches

Weight


55-75 pounds

General Health


Ken Mollett, the breed’s originator, was dedicated to rejuvenating the classic bulldog look by breeding only healthy dogs.  As a result, the Victorian Bulldog is free of genetic issues and is a very hardy breed.   The dogs can live to be 12 to 15 years of age.

History


In the 1980s, Mollett decided to start a line of bulldogs because the modern Bulldogs had become so unhealthy. He planned to make Bulldogs that resembled the bulldogs in old pictures. To do this, he crossed the healthiest Bulldogs, Staffords, Bullmastiffs, and Dogue de Bordeaux he could find. By 1985, Mollett had designed a dog breed that closely resembled that of Victorian Bulldogs and was healthier than English Bulldogs. Unfortunately, it is rare to find a real Victorian Bulldog because very few from the bloodline exist.

Maintenance


This breed is easy to groom. To keep their coat looking its best all it needs is to be brushed about once a week. Most importantly is to clean their face with a damp cloth regularly because dirt, food, and debris can build up in their deep wrinkles. For exercise, all the breed needs are regular walks. Even though they are not extremely active dogs, they should still get some exercise and play daily. What Victorian Bulldogs need most to keep them happy is lots of attention and time with their families.

Ideal Environment


Victorian Bulldogs are great in apartments and houses. They are not overly active so as long as they get walks a yard is not necessary. They need a family who has lots of time because they love attention. They can be around children of all ages and are fine with other animals. They can protect the family but are also great with strangers and are never timid. The breed makes great companions for older people and young families alike. However, environment is important to them because they cannot stand extremely hot or cold temperatures, so they do best in moderate climates. They need to be an inside dog because of their need to be with people and their low resistance to harsh weather. They also need a family who does not mind loud snoring or excessive

drooling.

Valley Bulldog

Valley Bulldog

General Description


The Valley Bulldog is a happy looking breed. They do not have an exact standard so there are variations. For example, some Valley Bulldogs have a pressed in muzzle while others have a longer muzzle. Their neck, as well as their head, is broad. They have small ears that fold over and hang down slightly on the sides of their heads. Their legs are much longer than that of many other Bulldogs, but their tails are very short almost nonexistent. Their eyes are small and semi-oval shaped. The breed can often have an over bite. Their coat is short and sleek like a Boxer’s. The fur comes in many colors, such as black, white, red, fawn, and any brindle mixture.

the valley bulldog should never have an over bite, the two dog’s used in this breed have under bite’s. I have been dealing with the valley bulldog sence 1991 and have never seen an over bite, i would stay away from a breeder that have valley’s with over bite’s “were did it come from”

The ear’s can fall forward this is called the button ear, or the ear’s can fold back this is the rosebud ear

They actually often have an underbite, not overbite.

Know something we don’t? Add it here

Character


The Valley Bulldog loves to be around humans. They get a lot of joy out of playing with children and other dogs. The breed is playful, yet intelligent. With their high intelligence, they can learn quickly and do well with tricks but, on the other hand, it makes them independent and stubborn. They will protect their family and bark at odd noises but are mostly calm in the house. However, they will sometimes run crazily through the house, but those bouts do not last long. They need a firm trainer, because of their sometimes disobedient nature and extreme strength.

Size


12-25 inches

Weight


50-85 pounds

General Health


The Valley Bulldog can develop skin infections so special attention is required to keep the folds clean and dry.   If the Valley Bulldog’s snout more closely resembles an English Bulldog, then it can be prone to having trouble breathing.  Most of these health concerns can be avoided by choosing a dog with a more boxer type snout. The life expectancy is about 10 to 12 years of age.

History


Valley Bulldogs originated in Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia, Canada which is where the breed’s name came from. These dogs developed after English Bulldogs were crossed with Boxers which accounts for the variations in the breed’s appearance.  Although the breed became popular in Canada in the 1900s, it is not known how old the breed is actually.

Maintenance


The Valley Bulldog is a fairly easy dog to groom. The breed needs to be brushed but not often and only requires a bath if they get filthy. The most important thing is to keep their tail, face, and belly clean and dry, so they should be dried off well after being in the bath or rain. Without proper drying, the breed can easily develop skin infections. Valley Bulldogs shed some, but not a lot. They need to be taken for long, fast-paced walks often and kept active mentally.

Ideal Environment


The Valley Bulldog is a friendly and gentle breed. They love being around people and do well with children. Plus they are friendly with other dogs and small animals. Valley Bulldogs need to be in an area with moderate climates because they do not do well with temperature extremes. Ideally, they will be an inside dog who receives lots of attention but who also receives regular strenuous exercise and training from a firm owner. Families who do not want to spend lots of time on grooming may find a good match with the Valley Bulldog as long as they remember to keep them dry.  If well-exercised, the dog can be happy in an apartment or in a house.

Miniature Australian Bulldog

Miniature Australian Bulldog, 7 months, Brindle and White, Here is Max again at 7 months.

General Description


(Mini Aussie Bulldog) The Miniature Australian Bulldog has a strong body, solid and compact.  The head is described as a “box on a box,” the box of the muzzle being attached to the box of the head. The head therefore should be very strong, and square. The eyes should be set wide apart, above a wide muzzle, and from one to three folds of wrinkles across the nose.  The nostrils should be large, and open.  The mouth can be up to a quarter- inch undershot, but breeders are attempting to bring that to a near level bite.  The teeth should be closely spaced, not scattered within the mouth.  The neck should have an arch, the chest should be broad and deep. The forearms should be set wide apart, with a slight shoulder angulation. The back, or “top line” should be level.  The hindquarters should be muscular, with hocks that are not straight, but rather moderately bent. The tail is either long or in screw.  Their feet resemble those of a cat, with rounded toes and hard pads. The preferred coat is short and smooth, not thick or rough. Coat colors can be in shades of fawn, apricot, orange, red, mahogany, white, as well as at least 5 shades of brindle including red, fawn, black, mahogany and silver. They can also come in a pied color. Females should have a long body, as this typically makes it easier for them to whelp.

Know something we don’t? Add it here

Character


The Miniature Australian Bulldog is an intelligent breed, loyal to its owner, and friendly and affectionate with children. They are outgoing and love to play, and swim. They make good watchdogs – although are not so good as guard dogs, due to their size. Obedience training is recommended.

Size


14 inches

Weight


30 pounds

General Health


Breeders are making an effort to breed out the hereditary diseases that afflict other bulldog breeds, but whether they are completely successful remains to be seen.

History


In 1997, in an effort to create a healthier version of the English Bulldog, breeders Mrs. Pip Nobes and Mrs. Lee?ann Milton began to take full-sized Australian Bulldogs and crossing them with the Pug and French Bulldog.

Maintenance


Comb and brush the coat on a regular basis. Bathe only when necessary. Wipe the face with a damp cloth every day to clean inside the wrinkles. This breed is an average shedder.

Ideal Environment


This breed is an indoor dog, and should not be left outside all day in a kennel. They do best in temperate climates – the breed chills easily in cold weather, and has trouble cooling off in very hot weather.

Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldog

Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge

General Description


(Old Time Bulldog) The Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge is a stocky, medium-sized dog with a confident demeanor and an athletic, powerful appearance. Their strong bodies are compact, muscular, and feature many of the traditional bulldog characteristics. Their brawny shoulders slope slightly and their straight, well-boned fore legs are set far apart. Their hindquarters are solid and muscular, and their broad feet are strong, thickly padded, and feature a tight set of toes with curved nails. The breed’s well-developed second thigh projects an image of power, yet the Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge is not cumbersome or awkward. Their chest is broad and deep with properly sprung ribs that sit down between the fore legs. Their back is short and their thick, arched neck is of moderate length. They have a solid top line and well-marked withers. The Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge has a broad, large head with an upper region that is slightly convex. The breed’s prominent forehead is wider than it is tall, furrowed, and features loose, thick skin that forms wrinkles. Wrinkled skin also exists around the breed’s throat, cheeks, and sides of the head. Their muzzle is broad, deep and in proportion to the size of the head. They have a wide nose with open nostrils and a pair of wide, rose- or button-shaped ears that are set high on the head. The coat of the Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge is smooth, flat, short-haired, and of fine texture. There are a number of acceptable coat colors including brindle, pied variations, black, slate gray, and blue.

Know something we don’t? Add it here

Character


The Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge is a highly adaptable breed that will thrive in virtually any household or environment. They are affectionate and attached to their master, and they are capable of adjusting to any type of lifestyle. They are loyal, sociable, and they get along very well with all types of people. They love children and they consistently aim to please. While they aren’t a guardian breed, the Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge is a determined protector. They will not allow intruders to enter their household unnoticed. They seek human attention and companionship, and they need to feel as though they are an important part of the family. This breed is generally good with other dogs, but they shouldn’t be expected to get along with cats.

Size


19 – 21 inches

Weight


60 – 90 pounds

General Health


The Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge is a hardy breed with no recorded health issues or concerns. They can live up to 14 years.

History


The Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge’s breeding program goes back to the late 1980’s, when a man by the name of Steve Barnett became interested in re-creating a variety of bulldog that was based on historical bulldog breeds. Mr. Barnett was attempting to develop his “ideal” bulldog, and he utilized his earlier bulldog breeding experiences to do so. He wanted to develop a breed that had a powerful, athletic presence, a graceful show appearance, and a pure bulldog temperament. Mr. Barnett’s Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge is very similar to the bulldog breeds of the early 16th century. These old bulldogs were bred for kings and queens during that time, and they also participated in early barbaric sports like bear baiting and bull baiting. The Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge is said to be the original English Bulldogge, and the national breed of England.

Maintenance


The smooth, short-haired coat of the Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge is easy to groom and care for. The coat should be brushed with a soft brush or rubbed down with a clean, soft cloth on a daily basis. Owners of this breed should ensure that the facial wrinkles of the Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge are clean and free of dirt and stains.

Ideal Environment


The Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge is content to live outside or inside and they can handle any amount of physical activity. The breed is adaptable and will adjust to the amount of exercise that is given. They are content to live in a small household or apartment.

Share
Print Print

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*